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Asine, Argolid (1922, 1924, 1926, 1930, 1970–1974, 1976–1978, 1985, 1989–1990)

Published: 15/05/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the site of Asine and its surroundings (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the site of Asine and its surroundings (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

The site of Asine is located c. 8 km south-west of today’s city of Nauplio. The ancient remains here are spread out over the top and slopes of the 330 m long and 50 m tall acropolis cliff jutting out into the Argolis bay, as well as on the Barbouna hill just to the west. On both sides of the acropolis there are beaches, the western one providing an excellent harbour. Across from the acropolis the island of Romvi functions as a breakwater, protecting the landing.

Makrakomi, Phthiotis (2010–2015)

Published: 02/06/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the site of Makrakomi (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the site of Makrakomi (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

Between 2010 and 2015 the Makrakomi Archaeological Landscapes Project (MALP) conducted fieldwork around the village of Makrakomi in the Spercheios valley, located in the western part of Phthiotis (central Greece). Limited by tall mountains in the south, north and west, the valley and its homonymous river stretches towards the Malian gulf in the east. Due to its position, the valley has acted as a border zone between northern and southern Greece, as well as a natural passage for both armies and travellers. This made the valley increasingly important during the Late Classical and Hellenistic period as armies marched across Greece more frequently following the rise of Macedonia.

Malthi, Messenia (1926–1929, 1933–1934, 1952, 2015–2017)

Published: 24/04/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the fortified settlement of Malti (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the fortified settlement of Malti (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

During the Bronze Age a flourishing community existed on and around Malthi, the northern spur of the mountain range of Ramovouni, located a few kilometers from the village Vasiliko in northern Messenia. On the ridge itself, c. 100 meter above the valley floor, a fortified Middle to Late Bronze Age settlement was situated. From here it had a splendid view of the valley which offered easy communications between inland Peloponnese and the coast.

Midea, Argolid (1939, 1963, 1983–2009)

Published: 18/05/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the site of Midea (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the site of Midea (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

The acropolis of Midea and its important Late Bronze Age citadel is located on a 270 m tall conical hill in the Argolid, 1.5 km from the contemporary cemetery at Dendra and about midway between Tiryns and Mycenae. From the top of the hill, looking south and west the site offers a magnificent view of the Argive plain and gulf. To the north and east the tall inland mountains dominate the landscape. This view, making it possible to monitor the plain and its approaches, possibly contributed to the importance of the site during the Bronze Age. 

 

Berbati valley, Argolid (1935–1938, 1953, 1959, 1988–1990, 1994–1995, 1997, 1999)

Published: 30/06/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over prominent sites in the Berbati, Limnes and Miyio valleys (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over prominent sites in the Berbati, Limnes and Miyio valleys (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

Swedish archaeologists have conducted fieldwork in and around the Berbati valley in the Argolid on the Peloponnese since the 1930s. Initially work was focused on excavations in the western part of the Berbati valley itself, but later the investigations came to incorporate also the Limnes and Miyio valleys located to the east. The investigated area is encircled by tall mountains and clearly delimited from its surroundings. To the south, over the mountain ridge of Euboia lies the plain of Argolis and to the west Mycenae is reachable through a pass between the mountains Zara and Profitis Elias. To the north and over the Psili Rachi lies the valley of Ayonori while the area to the east of the Limnes and Miyio valleys is dominated by tall mountains. Due to the location between Corinth and the Argolid, the three valleys have been described as a border region, dominated by one or the other of the two cities throughout the millennia.

Kastelli hill, Chania (1969–2014)

Published: 30/06/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the site of Chania with site indicated (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the site of Chania with site indicated (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

The archaeological site of Agia Aikaterini square is located on the Kastelli hill in Chania, Crete, close to the harbour of the old town. Continuous human habitation from Neolithic times until today has been identified here, a period of about 5000 years, interrupted only between the end of the Bronze Age and the Late Geometric Period (c. 1150–735 BC). The site of the Late Minoan period may be identical with Kydonia, a place known from Linear B tablets. Besides uncovering an impressive urban settlement, the excavations at Chania have been important for two particular reasons. Firstly, they were the first to firmly identify an important Minoan centre on western Crete. Previously it had been believed that Minoan influence was limited the east half of the island. Secondly, the five Linear B tablets discovered in 1989–1990 were the only ones found outside of Knossos since the beginning of the 20th century.

Aphidna, Attica (1894)

Published: 23/06/2020

<p>Fig. 1: Map over the site of Aphidna (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).</p>

Fig. 1: Map over the site of Aphidna (Basemap: Google maps satellite image).

The ancient site of Aphidna is found just east of Kosmothea in north-east Attica, close to the plain of Marathon. A Classical fortification is situated on the Kotroni hill, while the Charadra stream is located just below and to the south-west with a Middle Bronze Age tumulus on the southern side. A second stream, the Varnavas, flows about 1.5 km to the east. In the late 19th century both rivers emptied into Lake Marathon c. 2.5 km away; today, the landscape has been radically changed as a dam has increased the size of the lake almost to the Kotroni hill.

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