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The Athens Greek Religion Seminar

E. Balomenou, ˮWere Gods Meant to Entertain? Exploring Performativity, Theatricality and Entertainment in the Aegean Bronze Age Religionˮ

21 April 2015, 15:00
Swedish Institute at Athens (Mitseon 9, Akropolis metro station)

Elene Balomenou (University of Athens)
“Were Gods Meant to Entertain? Exploring Performativity, Theatricality and Entertainment in the Aegean Bronze Age Religion.’’

The religious cult in the Aegean Bronze Age has been thoroughly explored by the study of the available iconographical and architectural data of the Minoan and the Mycenaean material culture, by its extensive comparison with other contemporary prehistoric cultures and evidently by its relation to the posterior ancient Greek religion. Subsequently, in light of the various theoretical patterns and of the recent disciplines emerging in the past century, the Aegean Bronze Age religion was developed as a component of socioeconomic investigation while the remaining evidence of its ritual practice was observed at some length in the field of anthropological interpretation. Since this religious ritual practice has been highlighted as religious ritual action, the foundations have been laid in order to extend our notion of the Aegean Bronze Age religion and situate it as center of live experience, demonstration activity and subsequently as the scenery of a staged spectacle and display. The aim of this paper will be to point out the dialectic infusion among these dimensions, which seems to source as religious symbolic action but could as well flow as a vivid entertaining performance.

Aegean Lecture

Th. Giannopoulos, The traditional paradigm of the Indo-European problem and the «Coming of the Greeks»

The Swedish Institute at Athens and Aegeus – Society for Aegean Prehistory invite you to the lecture:

The traditional paradigm of the Indo-European problem and the “Coming of the Greeks” (in Greek)

by Theodoros G. Giannopoulos (Open University of Cyprus)

Friday 17 April 2015, 19:00.

Asea in Arcadia

Jeannette Forsén, Published: 01/04/2015

<p>Asea Palaeokastro. Photo: J. Forsén</p>

Asea Palaeokastro. Photo: J. Forsén

Asea is located in the heart of the Peloponnese. The Asea valley was inhabited, first in the Middle/Upper Paleolithic period (ca. 40.000 B.P) by people making their living from hunting and fishing. During most of the Neolithic period and the Bronze Age there were several villages in the valley, of which the most important one was located on the Asea Paleokastro hill.

Aphidna in northern Attica

Ann-Louise Schallin, Published: 01/04/2015

<p>A 2000 view of the acropolis from the north. Photo: Berit Wells</p>

A 2000 view of the acropolis from the north. Photo: Berit Wells

Aphidna was in Classical times one of the Attic demes and an important fort protecting the northern Attic border. The fortress is situated on the acropolis of Kotroni on the northwestern edge of the Marathon Lake.

Makrakomi

Published: 01/04/2015

From 2010 onwards the Swedish Institute and the Archaeological Ephorate in Lamia have jointly been carrying out archaeological investigations in the western Spercheios Valley, in the modern municipality of Makrakomi, as part of the Makrakomi Archaeological Landscapes Project (MALP) under the general direction of the director of the Ephorate, Maria-Photeini Papakonstantinou…

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